Paints and Good Food

By Michael Buss, 2016-05-06

The Arts Council swapped out its customary annual soiree this year for an evening of painting. The event was to have been in the smart new oyster bar, Caffe Primo, which decided at the very last moment that they were unwilling to accommodate the 40 or so erstwhile artists. But by very good fortune our dear friends from Downtown Anaheim managed to get the party relocated inside the Good Food Hall across the way.

And so it was that the people from Paints Uncorked got us all set up with mini-easels, paper plates with daubs of primary colors, and three brushes apiece. It was a tight squeeze but nobody minded.

Before long the demonstrator had us all following along, building up colors and shapes, until eventually we all had our own versions of a silhouetted woman on a brightly lit Parisian street. I assume it was Parisian, but who would really know? It was certainly impressionist.

To say it was fun would be an understatement. It was huge fun. The artists-for-the-night betook themselves to adorn their paintings with their own embellishments such that one could only go around admiring the ingenuity of everyone else's work.

As a fund raiser the event was inevitably limited by the number of painters, each paying some $25 or $35 to attend. But funds were supplemented by a silent auction.

Thanks to Carol Latham, Lori Dinwiddie and Reon Boydstun Howard who made the arrangements; to the girls from Paints Uncorked who kept out spirits alive with their bonhomie; and the Good Food bars, Cervantes Mexican Restaurant and Healthy Junk which supplied patrons with food and beverages.

Here are a few pictures to tell the story.

Thank you for bailing us out! And the food was great.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 


Sir Kenneth Robinson speaking on Changing Education Paradigms.

A paradigm is a pattern, example or schema. Here this world renowned educator and lecturer challenges many of the assumptions that underlie modern education. He argues that the way we are going now will not produce enough of the creative, innovative graduates that the modern workforce requires. What would it take to make the change?

Watch the video and enjoy! Then watch it again, and pass it on to others.